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Walden’s BS in Psychology: Lay the Foundation for a Rewarding Career

Do you want to learn more about the human mind and use those insights to help others? Walden’s BS in Psychology online program equips you with a versatile skill set and the specialized knowledge you need to shape a meaningful career path.

In this program, you’ll study topics you’re passionate about now—and chart a clear course for your future. Graduate with educational experiences that can help you grow professionally. Become a positive force for happier and more resilient individuals, families, and communities.

A BS in Psychology program provides students with an academic foundation of psychological principles and practices that apply to many different job roles.

Why Choose Walden?

Focus Your Studies

Personalize your coursework by selecting from an array of concentration options that include Addiction and Forensic Psychology.

Work With a Faculty Coach

Get personal, one-on-one assistance as you navigate through your schooling and consider future career prospects and planning.

Start on Your Master’s

Get a jump on your master’s degree by completing up to five graduate-level courses at the undergraduate tuition rate.

Become a Catalyst for Change

Walden’s social change mission is woven throughout our curriculum to prepare you to make a real difference for others.

Balance School With Life

We offer short, six-week courses to help you manage your time and fit your studies in with other commitments.

Prepare for Today’s Field

Our BS in Psychology curriculum follows American Psychological Association (APA) Undergraduate Psychology 2.0 standards.

Program Savings

Receive up to a $5,000 Grant if you reside in the U.S. and start this program on November 29, 2021. Contact one of our Enrollment Specialists to learn more.

Get Started Now

Program Details

General Psychology Concentration Curriculum

Degree Completion Requirements

  • 181 quarter credits (1 semester credit equals 1.5 quarter credits)
    • General education courses (46 cr.)
    • Core courses (35 cr.)
    • Concentration courses (25 cr.)
    • Psychology elective courses (10 cr.)
    • General Elective courses (65 cr.)

This sequence represents the minimum time to completion. Time to completion will vary by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 855-646-5286.

Courses

Course Code Title Credits

Core Courses

PSYC 1001
Introduction to Psychology

In this course, students will be introduced to the scientific study of observable behavior and internal experiences such as thoughts and feelings. Psychological facts, principles, and theories associated with methods of analysis, learning, memory, brain functioning, sensation, perception, motivation, emotions, personality, social behavior, human development, and psychological disorders and treatment will be introduced. Students will learn to understand human behavior by examining the integrative influences of biological, psychological, and social-cultural factors. The concepts in this course will prepare psychology majors for more in-depth study of the major areas of psychology, and will provide a foundational understanding of human behavior for non-psychology majors.

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2000
Psychology Seminar

In this survey course, BS in Psychology program majors assess their marketable skills, career needs, and career goals. Students learn to make informed choices and plans regarding graduate training in psychology or other related fields of study, as well as job-seeking skills in psychology. Additional topics covered are introductory-level approaches to critical thinking, information literacy skills, and writing in the format and style of the discipline. Students will also reflect on how their chosen major of psychology relates to Walden's mission of social change. This course is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Prerequisites

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2001
Cross-Cultural Psychology

Contemporary life requires the ability to relate to people who are different. In this course, students will explore major areas of psychology in light of culture's influence, challenging their own world views and unconscious biases in order to develop greater sensitivity to the impact of cultural differences on interactions in a variety of settings. Topics include definitions and approaches to understanding culture; the role of psychology in understanding bias; cultural aspects of cognition and intelligence; emotion; motivation; development and socialization; disorders; and applications of cross-cultural psychology.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2009
Theories of Personality

This course is an introduction to the theoretical approaches to understanding personality. Students examine key theorists and theories including psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, biological, behaviorist, and social-cognitive approaches. Perspectives on personality are applied to personal and social issues.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 OR PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3002
Introduction to Basic Statistics

A hallmark of science is the use of numbers to convey research findings; understanding these numbers has both practical and academic value. In this course, students examine basic statistical principles and vocabulary, differentiating methods of data analysis, and interpreting statistical results. The goal of the course is for students to better understand the importance of statistics in research.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000
  • MATH 1030

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • MATH 1030

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3003
Methods in Psychological Inquiry

A variety of factors may cloud judgment when interpreting experiences.In this course, students learn about research methods that psychologists use to test hypotheses in an objective and systematic manner to minimize biases, providing a framework for more accurate conclusions. Students examine experimental and non-experimental methods, issues related to the validity and reliability of measurement, dependent and independent variables, sampling, and ethical concerns related to psychological research.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000
  • PSYC 3002

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 3002

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4010
Psychology Capstone

In this course, students integrate knowledge and skills attained through their psychology coursework to create a final Capstone Paper that examines one area of psychology through a professional lens. In addition, students engage in scholarly discourse about key issues and theories, including ethics, learned throughout the program. Finally, students reflect on their experience in the program and consider career possibilities that might utilize their learning while considering ways to contribute to positive social change.

Prerequisites

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000
  • PSYC 2001
  • PSYC 2009
  • PSYC 3002
  • PSYC 3003

(5 cr.)

Concentration Courses

5 credits must be at the 3000 or 4000 level
Individual and Society (Choose one)
PSYC 2005
Social Influences on Behavior

Individuals are often influenced by others and by the social situations in which they find themselves. Students in this course examine the basic concepts and applications of social psychology, including attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; stereotyping; prejudice and discrimination; interpersonal relationships; group behavior; and the effect of environmental stress on behavior. They also learn how bias can sway objective conclusions as well as how ethical factors influence research in social psychology. Students apply principles and theories presented in the course to case studies and situations in daily life, including instances of stereotyping and discrimination. They also use these theories to understand strategies for helping others and reducing aggressive behavior.

Prerequisites

BS in Health Studies Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Human Services Child and Adolescent Development Concentration

  • None

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

BS in Public Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 3005
Racial and Ethnic Identities

Most people recognize and appreciate the individuality of human beings, including race and ethnicity as related to self-perception and to the perception of others. In this course, students explore their own racial and ethnic identities in the context of contemporary psychological knowledge as well as contemporary issues and challenges related to race and ethnicity. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including the development of racial and ethnic identities; social classification; privilege and stigma; perceptions of racial and ethnic identities; assimilation; inequalities in race and ethnicity; and the relationship of race and ethnicity to social change. Students apply psychological concepts to better understand their own sense of ethnic and racial identities and how these identities shape their experiences in the world.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 3006
Psychology of Gender

Researchers have demonstrated that there are few psychological differences between men and women. And yet history and conventional thinking indicate otherwise. Students in this course are introduced to the basic theories, principles, and applications of gender and gender differences. Students explore distinctions between sex and gender, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality and sexual orientation; gender differences in social behavior, perception, and cognitive abilities; and cross-cultural research on gender and sexuality. Through discussions and applications, students debunk myths surrounding sex and gender similarities and differences, and they apply theories to case examples and individual experiences.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 4006
Global Perspectives in Psychology

While traditional psychology in the United States has been Western in focus, increased globalization has promoted an examination into human behavior from a broader perspective that includes the influence of cultural and global trends on individual and group behavior. In this course, students explore a variety of global perspectives in psychology as well as some of the issues and controversies facilitated by differing cultures. They explore and discuss trends and research methods in global psychology, indigenous psychology, psychotherapy in a global world, and the role of psychologists internationally. Students critically evaluate psychological issues from a global rather than a domestic perspective.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 4008
Intergroup Conflict and Peace Building

In a world encumbered with conflict, tension, and injustice, strategies for building peace are essential. In this course, students assess theories and principles of conflict management and resolution. They examine and employ theories and applications of intergroup dynamics; principles and underlying philosophies of non-violence; and social science principles to understand conflict and promote peace. Students gain practical experience applying principles of peace building to proposing solutions for contemporary, individual, and social issues.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
Experimental (Choose one)
PSYC 2004
Motivation and Emotion

What drives people to do what they do? In this course students have the opportunity to answer this question as they explore basic theories of motivation and emotion. They also explore bodily needs, such as hunger, thirst, and sex, that drive people to action; concepts in motivation, such as achievement, altruism, and conflict; and concepts related to emotion, including happiness, hormonal influences, and mood. Students assess content and share different perspectives through peer discussions on related topics, such as sources of motivation, hunger and eating, need for power, extraversion, goals, and decision making.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 2008
Learning

How do people learn, and what strategies maximize learning? In this course, students have an introduction to the behavioral and cognitive bases of learning and memory. Students engage in contextual and application-based assignments, such as simulation lab work, focusing on classical and operant conditioning, cognitive theories of learning, and introductory concepts of memory. Students apply learning principles and concepts, such as social learning theory and locus of control, to real-world behavior and performance.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 3001
Cognitive Psychology

Students in this course are provided with a comprehensive overview of cognitive psychology, the scientific study of mental processes: How people acquire, store, transform, use, and communicate information. Topics may include perception, attention, language, memory, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, and creativity.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 4002
Brain and Behavior

The study of the brain and how it functions has contributed significantly to the understanding of how people react and adapt to their environments. In this course, students examine basic brain physiology and learn how the brain functions to control behavior. Students explore specific applications of brain structure to memory and attention, sensation and perception, development, socialization, motivation and emotion, and socialization. They apply concepts and theories about the brain to psychological health and well-being.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
Developmental (Choose one)
PSYC 2002
Human Development: Childhood and Adolescence

Humans experience many developmental changes throughout the lifespan, but those of greatest significance occur from conception to young adulthood. In this course, students examine key theories related to various aspects of development in infants, children, and adolescents. Students apply social, biological, and cognitive maturation processes and perspectives to better understand their own development and personal experiences. They also discuss related topics, such as cross-cultural issues, attachment and temperament, language and personality development, and puberty and sexual development.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Child and Adolescent Development Concentration

  • None

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
OR
PSYC 2003
Human Development: Adulthood

Adulthood represents a rich developmental experience including many significant life transitions. In this course, students explore the key theories, transitions, and applications of adult development. They examine the social, biological, and cognitive maturation processes that define development of adulthood into older age. Students engage in assignments designed to provide practical application of theories to specific transitions and topical issues, such as career changes, attachment and marital satisfaction, personality, retirement, and cognition. Applying concepts presented in the course, students discuss cross-cultural issues in development, emotional development, adult roles, memory, and physical aging.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
Applied Psychology (Choose two)
Choose two; one must be 3000 or 4000 level
PSYC 2006
Introduction to Addiction

Students in this course are introduced to the nature of addiction and the impairment in individuals who suffer from addictions. It includes a review of theories on substance disorders and approaches to identification, prevention, and treatment. Topics include historical perspectives, diagnoses, types of addictive behaviors, treatment, and current research.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2100
Workplace Psychology

Students will be introduced to the field of industrial organizational psychology where the principles of psychology are applied within the workplace. Key topics will illustrate how the tenets of industrial organizational psychology apply at three levels: the individual, group, and organizational levels. Students will also explore each side of the field: Industrial and Organizational sides. On the industrial side, students will examine job analysis, selection, training, and performance measurement. Focusing on the organizational psychology side, students will explore motivation, teams, communication, and leadership in organizations. Lastly, ethics, culture, and legal implications will be integrated throughout the course.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 2101
Introduction to Forensic Psychology

Students in this course are provided with an expansive overview of forensic psychology, including basic tenets, practices, and procedures. Students explore subspecialties of forensic psychology; roles and responsibilities; and related legal, ethical, and diversity issues. They learn how forensic psychology links to the criminal justice system as they explore related topics, including criminal profiling, police psychology, psychology in the criminal courts, and correctional psychology. Through this course, students acquire a broad understanding of forensic psychology theories and concepts, which they apply to the analysis of controversial issues and contemporary challenges within the field.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3004
Psychological Disorders

Psychological disorders form the basis of diagnosis in psychology. In this course, students examine a wide variety of common psychological disorders, including mood, thought, anxiety, substance abuse, sexual, personality, and dissociative disorders. Students also explore underlying causes, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments. They examine concepts of normal and abnormal as related to psychology, methods used in the process of diagnosis, and the measurement of psychological functioning. Students also differentiate among disorders and learn limits to effective diagnosis. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students demonstrate their understanding through practical application and case study assignments.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3007
Influence and Persuasion

Students in this course examine major concepts and theories of influence and persuasion. Understanding the psychology of influence and persuasion, and recognizing how we use it in daily interactions—or how we experience it used by others—is a vital component of making positive decisions about relationships and careers, as well as everyday challenges and opportunities in our lives. Students will apply specific theories to common situations to analyze and evaluate the impact of influence and persuasion on their own and others' attitudes, beliefs, and behavior. Particular areas of study include influence and persuasion in daily communication; cultural considerations; media and consumer behavior; and politics and leader influence. Throughout the course, students also apply self-reflection strategies to case studies and their personal experiences and also assess the ethical aspects of influence and persuasion.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 (or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3009
Psychology of Leadership

Are leaders made or born? This question has been debated for decades. Building on requisite comprehension of psychology, such as understanding development and behavior, mental processes, and how people interact, students apply this knowledge in consideration of what makes a leader. They examine theories and principles of leadership and leader development. Students engage in coursework focused on leadership styles, characteristics and qualities of effective leaders, cultural issues, empowerment and development, ethics and values, and global leadership. They apply leadership concepts and principles to personal experiences to contextualize theory and further examine the leadership role.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Leadership and Administration Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4001
Cultural Perspectives in Health Psychology

How does one's culture influence health-related behavior and how does culture impact an individual's response to stress, pain, and illness? In this course, students learn how biological, psychological, sociological, and cognitive factors affect individual health behaviors. Students engage in discussions and practical, application-based assignments on a variety of topics, including cultural responses to health, stress management, and coping mechanisms; pain theory and management techniques; health psychology theories and models; and strategies for helping people achieve health psychology goals when faced with illness. Students apply principles of health psychology to case studies and real-life examples related to promoting, achieving, and maintaining optimal health as well as psychological adjustment to illness in different cultures.

Prerequisites

BS in Health Studies Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Human Services Leadership and Administration Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

BS in Public Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)

Psychology Electives

10 credits from the list below or any from the 5000-level courses in the School of Psychology AIM list or any undergraduate level PSYC course. You must take different courses from what you chose for your concentration courses
PSYC 3001
Cognitive Psychology

Students in this course are provided with a comprehensive overview of cognitive psychology, the scientific study of mental processes: How people acquire, store, transform, use, and communicate information. Topics may include perception, attention, language, memory, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, and creativity.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3004
Psychological Disorders

Psychological disorders form the basis of diagnosis in psychology. In this course, students examine a wide variety of common psychological disorders, including mood, thought, anxiety, substance abuse, sexual, personality, and dissociative disorders. Students also explore underlying causes, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatments. They examine concepts of normal and abnormal as related to psychology, methods used in the process of diagnosis, and the measurement of psychological functioning. Students also differentiate among disorders and learn limits to effective diagnosis. Applying concepts and theories learned in the course, students demonstrate their understanding through practical application and case study assignments.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3005
Racial and Ethnic Identities

Most people recognize and appreciate the individuality of human beings, including race and ethnicity as related to self-perception and to the perception of others. In this course, students explore their own racial and ethnic identities in the context of contemporary psychological knowledge as well as contemporary issues and challenges related to race and ethnicity. Students explore and discuss a variety of topics, including the development of racial and ethnic identities; social classification; privilege and stigma; perceptions of racial and ethnic identities; assimilation; inequalities in race and ethnicity; and the relationship of race and ethnicity to social change. Students apply psychological concepts to better understand their own sense of ethnic and racial identities and how these identities shape their experiences in the world.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Psychology Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3006
Psychology of Gender

Researchers have demonstrated that there are few psychological differences between men and women. And yet history and conventional thinking indicate otherwise. Students in this course are introduced to the basic theories, principles, and applications of gender and gender differences. Students explore distinctions between sex and gender, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality and sexual orientation; gender differences in social behavior, perception, and cognitive abilities; and cross-cultural research on gender and sexuality. Through discussions and applications, students debunk myths surrounding sex and gender similarities and differences, and they apply theories to case examples and individual experiences.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3007
Influence and Persuasion

Students in this course examine major concepts and theories of influence and persuasion. Understanding the psychology of influence and persuasion, and recognizing how we use it in daily interactions—or how we experience it used by others—is a vital component of making positive decisions about relationships and careers, as well as everyday challenges and opportunities in our lives. Students will apply specific theories to common situations to analyze and evaluate the impact of influence and persuasion on their own and others' attitudes, beliefs, and behavior. Particular areas of study include influence and persuasion in daily communication; cultural considerations; media and consumer behavior; and politics and leader influence. Throughout the course, students also apply self-reflection strategies to case studies and their personal experiences and also assess the ethical aspects of influence and persuasion.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 (or PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 3009
Psychology of Leadership

Are leaders made or born? This question has been debated for decades. Building on requisite comprehension of psychology, such as understanding development and behavior, mental processes, and how people interact, students apply this knowledge in consideration of what makes a leader. They examine theories and principles of leadership and leader development. Students engage in coursework focused on leadership styles, characteristics and qualities of effective leaders, cultural issues, empowerment and development, ethics and values, and global leadership. They apply leadership concepts and principles to personal experiences to contextualize theory and further examine the leadership role.

Prerequisites

BS in Human Services Leadership and Administration Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4001
Cultural Perspectives in Health Psychology

How does one's culture influence health-related behavior and how does culture impact an individual's response to stress, pain, and illness? In this course, students learn how biological, psychological, sociological, and cognitive factors affect individual health behaviors. Students engage in discussions and practical, application-based assignments on a variety of topics, including cultural responses to health, stress management, and coping mechanisms; pain theory and management techniques; health psychology theories and models; and strategies for helping people achieve health psychology goals when faced with illness. Students apply principles of health psychology to case studies and real-life examples related to promoting, achieving, and maintaining optimal health as well as psychological adjustment to illness in different cultures.

Prerequisites

BS in Health Studies Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Human Services Leadership and Administration Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

BS in Public Health Psychology and Behavior Concentration

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4002
Brain and Behavior

The study of the brain and how it functions has contributed significantly to the understanding of how people react and adapt to their environments. In this course, students examine basic brain physiology and learn how the brain functions to control behavior. Students explore specific applications of brain structure to memory and attention, sensation and perception, development, socialization, motivation and emotion, and socialization. They apply concepts and theories about the brain to psychological health and well-being.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4006
Global Perspectives in Psychology

While traditional psychology in the United States has been Western in focus, increased globalization has promoted an examination into human behavior from a broader perspective that includes the influence of cultural and global trends on individual and group behavior. In this course, students explore a variety of global perspectives in psychology as well as some of the issues and controversies facilitated by differing cultures. They explore and discuss trends and research methods in global psychology, indigenous psychology, psychotherapy in a global world, and the role of psychologists internationally. Students critically evaluate psychological issues from a global rather than a domestic perspective.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or (PSYC 1002 and PSYC 1003)
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y or PSYC 1002 or PSYC 1003

(5 cr.)
PSYC 4008
Intergroup Conflict and Peace Building

In a world encumbered with conflict, tension, and injustice, strategies for building peace are essential. In this course, students assess theories and principles of conflict management and resolution. They examine and employ theories and applications of intergroup dynamics; principles and underlying philosophies of non-violence; and social science principles to understand conflict and promote peace. Students gain practical experience applying principles of peace building to proposing solutions for contemporary, individual, and social issues.

Prerequisites

BS in Psychology

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y
  • PSYC 2000

All Other Programs

  • PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1001Y

(5 cr.)

General Electives

Choose 13 courses from General Education, BS in Psychology, Accelerate into Master’s courses, or other Walden bachelor’s degree programs. Five courses (25 credits) must be from 3000, 4000, or 5000 level coursework. Elective credits must total 65 credits to meet the BS in Psychology program requirements.
VIEW ALL COURSES Less Courses

AIM: Get a Jump on Your Master’s Degree

Through our BS in Psychology Accelerate Into Master’s (AIM) concentration option, you can potentially complete both degrees in less time—and at a lower cost— than earning each degree separately. AIM-eligible master's programs at Walden include:

  • MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
  • MS in Forensic Psychology
  • MS in Industrial and Organizational Psychology
  • MS in Developmental Psychology
  • MS in Human and Social Services
  • MS in Nonprofit Management and Leadership 
  • MS in Criminal Justice
  • MS in Criminal Justice Leadership and Executive Management
  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Healthcare Administration
  • Master of Public Administration
  • MS in Health Education and Promotion 

Learn more about Accelerate Into Master’s (AIM).

Admission Requirements

Admission is considered for adult students who hold a high school diploma or its equivalent. Applicants must also meet one of the following criteria:

  • You are 21 years of age or older.
  • You are less than 21 years of age with at least 12 quarter credits.
  • You are an active member of the military or a veteran with documentation of service.

More information for international applicants.

Tuition and Fees

Curriculum Component Requirements Cost Amount
Tuition 181 quarter credit hours $325 per quarter hour $58,825
Technology Fee Per quarter $160 $2,560


  $61,385*

*Tuition reflects the minimum time to completion. Time to completion varies by student, depending on individual progress and credits transferred, if applicable. Tuition and time to complete may be reduced if transfer credits are accepted, or if you receive grants, scholarships or other tuition reductions. Walden may accept up to 135 transfer credits. For a personalized estimate of the number of your transfer credits that Walden would accept, call an Enrollment Specialist at 844-768-0109.

Tuition and fees are subject to change. Books and materials are not included and may cost up to an additional $5,000.

Concentrations

Accelerate Into Master’s (AIM)

Earn up to 25 master’s-level credit hours by taking graduate-level courses at the undergraduate tuition rate.

Addiction

Explore theories of addiction, assessment, treatment planning, ethics, and prevention models for a range of addiction types.

Criminal Justice

Explore theories of criminology, profiling and the criminal mind, restorative justice, community responses, and victimology.

Forensic Psychology

Learn how to apply human behavior and psychology principles to make a positive impact on the criminal justice system.

Human Services

Examine the challenges facing society today—and learn how to help create meaningful and positive change in your community.

Workplace Psychology

Help organizations respond innovatively to challenges in the 21st century, global world of work.

Program Outcomes

Build the Foundation for a Rewarding Career

Walden’s bachelor’s program in psychology is purposefully designed to help you build foundational psychology knowledge and a highly transferable set of professional skills. Explore the latest psychology concepts, research, and theories while learning how to present evidence-based information to form your arguments. Whether you want to pursue a counseling career or another occupation in this broad field, our BS in Psychology program can set you on a path to your goals.

Career Outlook

A BS in Psychology is a versatile degree, providing you with universal skills that can be applied in a number of occupational roles and settings. Whether you plan to continue your studies at the graduate level or put your knowledge to work immediately in the field, an online psychology degree can help you shape the career you were meant for.

A BS in Psychology degree can prepare you to pursue career roles such as:1

  • Caseworker
  • Community organization worker
  • Public relations representative
  • Research assistant

A BS in Psychology degree can prepare you to work in settings such as:

  • Health clinics
  • Social services agencies
  • Government agencies
  • Courts

Career options may require additional experience, training, or other factors beyond the successful completion of this degree program.

Learning Outcomes

As a graduate of our BS in Psychology online degree program, you will be prepared to:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
  • Understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design and data analysis and interpretation.
  • Respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when possible, a scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes.
  • Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.
  • Tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a science serving a global society.
  • Apply cultural competencies to effective and sensitive interactions with people from diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives.

Resources

Meet Your Academic Team

  • Patty Costello

    Patty Costello

    Program Director

    Dr. Costello has been with Walden since 2009. A trained neuroscientist, her research areas include attention, perception, and implicit cognition. Putting her research into action, Dr. Costello recently wrote and published Catalina and the King’s Wall, a children’s book about embracing diversity.

  • Meredith McKee

    Academic Coordinator

    Dr. McKee has been teaching both online and in traditional classroom settings for more than 16 years. Her research interests include using principles of applied behavior analysis in the design of model behavioral programs for elementary and secondary educational settings.

  • Stacy Bjorkman

    Stacy Bjorkman

    Senior Core Faculty

    Dr. Bjorkman started her professional career as a K–12 school psychologist before transitioning to teaching in higher education more than 10 years ago. She is passionate about Walden’s mission of social change and acts as a change agent through volunteer work at several nonprofit organizations.

  • Bruce Powers

    Bruce Powers

    Core Faculty

    Dr. Powers completed his graduate work in developmental psychology at the University of Notre Dame. He enjoys working with children and discussing race, religion, and history. His current favorite course is Cross-Cultural Psychology.

Testimonials

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